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20121201
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starbucks in china and the u.s. within two years. "overall, there's going to be coffee available. that'll help you on pricing, so it might be a good time to be expanding." starbucks' expansion plans aren't only meared number of shops. in the last 12 months, its acquired juice company evolution fresh, bakery la boulange, and is about to finalize acquisition of tea company teavanna. tensions remain high in michigan's capitol city, where legislation is about to be passed that could weaken the power of unions. protestors are furious. republican lawmakers moved quickly last week to enact "right to work legislation," allowing workers at unionized companies not to pay dues to the union, which reduces bargaining power right in the uaw's own back yard. the measure has already been approved by both chambers of michigan's legislature, and final enactment could take place tomorrow. republican governor rick snyder supports the legislation. if enacted, it would make michigan the 24th state with right-to-work laws. recent strikes at a california shipping port are over, but concerns of outsourcing p
will be really looking forward to next year to see what unfolds, not only in the u.s., which i think there is some optimism about the growth prospects, especially housing, but i also think as far as china is concerned, most people consider that the economy to have troughed and look for good things to happen. so i think there is a lot of optimism - even in europe there's a lot of optimism, but we know how that all goes when there is a lot of optimism. so, anyway, slow trading expected this week. > will there be some last- minute adjustments, or have most of those folks already gone home and closed the books for the year? > > i think for the most part anyone that really had anything to do really has done it already. that would be the capital gains tax-type selling, that sort of thing. but there's always some minor window dressing issues that could come up. so i wouldn't really pay much attention to the price action this week. what is probably more important is the first couple weeks in january. > do you have any kind of end- of-the-year strategy here, or are you just kind of going sit
is a marginal trend to bring business back to the u.s., and food is one of those more likely to stay 'in country' than go elsewhere." challenger, gray and christmas say december is often when layoffs are announced, a process that often continues into january. wall street alone has lost a net 1,200 jobs in 2012 according to new york state's comptroller. and it's about to get a whole lot worse. citigroup is laying off 11,000 people worldwide. bank of america and hsbc combined plan for 40,000 layoffs this year. ubs said in october it would cut 10,000 workers. all told, more than 300,000 financial industry jobs have been lost worldwide during the past two years. the bank belt-tightening is expected to continue in 2013. macs are making their way back to the u.s. apple ceo tim cook told bloomberg this week the company will begin manufacturing a line of mac computers in the u.s. most of apple's products are made in asia. factories such as foxconn, a major apple supplier, have come under heavy scrutiny for low wages and poor working conditions. cook said the company will spend $100 million on the manufa
most expensive storm ever for the u.s., following hurricane katrina. the storm destroyed houses and businesses on the east coast, leaving millions without power. just months earlier, crop prices shot up following a massive drought that hit the midwest and some northern states. weeks without rain sent corn and soybean prices sky-high. it was estimated that the drought was the worst in nearly a quarter of a century. 2012 was not without its controvesies. trading scandals rocked the news, highlighted by jpmorgan chase. the big bank lost more than $2 billion in what was called "a trading debacle." ceo jamie dimon took a trip to capitol hill for a testimony where he told senators that the industry needs "strong regulation, not always more." meanwhile, at chick-fil-a, the ceo of the popular chain cooked up trouble with some very public comments opposing gay marriage. the comments created a divide between protestors and supporters, some of whom participated in a successful chick-fil-a appeciation day. and, in a shocking move, twinkie maker hostess closed its doors, claiming a strike by
toll on the southern plains and deep south. creative acccounting at the federal level. with the u.s. expected to reach its $16.4- trillion debt ceiling before the end of the year, the treasury department will undertake acccounting manuvers to create $200 billion in what treasury secretary timothy giethner calls "headroom." call it, "in your facebook." an instagram user has filed what could become a class-action lawsuit over a policy change that would allow instagram to sell ads using a person's name or photo published on the website. instagram announced it would backtrack on the idea, but eventually wants to come back to users and explain its intentions. the u.s. government may expand its mortgage refinancing program to include borrowers not backed by fannie mae and freddie mac and also include borrowers who owe more than their homes are worth - about 22% of all homes with a mortgage. from department stores to bookshops to jewelry sellers, a lot of retail stocks are dragging around their empty boxes and gift wrap post- christmas. mark sebastian of option pit joins us. mark, welcome
analysts, then sold off on word of declining blackberry sales in the u.s. nike stock jumped 6% higher after exceeding earnings expectations and revealing orders were up 6% in the quarter. now on to the market, which also gained ground yesterday on optimism a budget deal will emerge out of washington. meanwhile, the sleepless in america are creating a boost in business. consumers spending on treatments for insomnia shot up from $24 billion 4 years ago to $32 billion now. fortunately, it's a bumper year for the coffee crop in brazil. the country is harvesting its biggest coffee crop ever. and peter madoff is sentenced to the max of 10 years in prison for helping his brother bernie in their infamous ponzi scheme. scott bauer of trading advantage joins us on this friday morning for a closer look at the markets. good morning to you. we had a nice santa claus rally going on here. do you think that this fiscal talk is just going to kill it? > > no, it doesn't look like it. the trend over the last few days is, we have seen the market up, but we have seen it really kind of accelerate toward the end
will be re-paid, but leaves out small businesses and private companies. the u.s. senate is expected to start debating this afternoon on how much money to spend on repair costs in the wake of superstorm sanday. the current disaster aid package stands at $60.4 billion. the aid could become a political football. some republicans in the house want to consider a smaller initial amount to cover immediate needs until there's more evidence of the need for additional spending. fema, the federal emergency management agency's, disaster relief fund has nearly $5 billion, which is enough to pay for recovery costs into early spring. peabody energy corp. gets a lump of coal in its stocking. the st. louis-based coal producer says a drop in coal prices and lower market demand are dragging down its sales by about 2 million tons. coal producers have struggled this year against record low natural gas prices. those cheap prices prompt utilities to use it instead of coal for fuel. peabody does expect results to improve later this year. the latest identification scam may be closer than you think. jennifer waters o
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7